No blue ox or snus. The Mill’s chefs serve the best comfort food in Milton

Story and photos by Tami Jackson

Highball it to Milton because there’s a super swank new restaurant and sports bar there where an old favorite once sat. The old bar closed down and the building remained empty for seven years creating a community memory that creates a bit of a log jam for the new happening restaurant and bar that opened at 900 Meridian E. just a few months ago.

“The only negative feedback we’ve received came from people who remembered the old place and expected the same experience; lower quality food, cheaper prices, with pool tables and dart boards,” said Dustin Lowry, co-owner of “The Mill” restaurant and sports bar, which has been completely remodeled to an upscale lumberjack theme. “Fortunately, most people come in here and say ‘wow.’ They absolutely adore us.”

Merely a Paul Bunyan’s bedroll away from his home in Edgewood, Lowry kept his eye on the 6,000 square feet building that was vacant. He knew that long before it had been a bar, the location had supported a historic lumber mill, and since his grandfather had been in the logging industry, perhaps he could capitalize on that logger theme for decorating the establishment that would serve organic foods whenever possible, cooked from scratch to deliver the freshest of local ingredients. So together with his sister Kate Lowry, who has owned Ricky J’s, a bar and grill on 176th St at 68th Ave in the Frederickson neighborhood of Puyallup these past nine years, the two siblings opened their Milton destination together.

Here, folks have already come from far and wide to experience signature drinks, great music, and they can also watch any of a plethora of high definition televisions in the sports bar on any given game night or listen to bands that play on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and other nights on a special occasion. Chris Anderson, who sings crooner songs, such as Mack The Knife, was enjoyed by customers there recently. Yet the music acts at The Mill and the genres of music vary by event.

The ambiance inside the remodeled business is somewhat rustic with smooth finishes and modern lighting. Behind the front reception desk, there’s a big huge monstrous circular rusty saw-blade called the bolt thrower. “At the lumber mill, they’d have stumps that would come through and they didn’t want to ruin their good blades on a big chunky stump but would still need to demolish the stump. So they’d send this blade down from a big pendulum. As the stump would come down the conveyor belt the saw would just swing like this,” Dustin Lowry said, making the swinging arm gesture. Lowry then said he found the saw blade on Craigslist and said he bought it for only a couple hundred bucks. Yet now that it’s all rusted with a backlight against a nicely trimmed wall, it looks like it might have cost more than a few grand.

The Mill’s decor includes lots of roughly hewn wood and many large black and white pictures of logging camps and historical scenes from Milton and Edgewood. They’re photos from the 1910s through 1940s; all restored images that Dustin Lowry acquired from the Washington Historical Society.

“That’s my grandfather, he worked in the logging industry, and that was his hat and his axes,” Dustin Lowry said while pointing to a physical display in the hallway at the back of both the bar and restaurant.

Much of The Mill’s decor is from repurposed accessories like the painted metal lights and tall tables that were cut from the old bar. The overhead spaces feature huge two-man crosscut saws. The lower segment of the exterior walls is made with authentic river rock and the sports bar features a wooden shuffleboard. “The dining room tables were made for us out in Port Orchard and then we had a friend stain them for us to follow that mill-type feel,” Dustin Lowry said then pointed to some rusty metal paneling. “The big old mills had corrugated metal like that which they used as really cheap siding, so we bought a bunch of corrugated metal pieces and our contractor, S&S Renovations, figured out how to rust the inside grooves and then he coated it so our customers would not get tetanus with their dinner.”

The rigging crew who handled all the complicated planning for launching The Mill began with a chef whom the Lowrys recruited from the Pacific Grill. Alex Anton had grown up in the restaurant industry, thanks to his dad who also owned many successful restaurants, and Alex Anton’s first job was to guide the Lowrys on how to make the healthy, scratch made restaurant kitchen that sourced locally to come to fruition, where a full staff of chefs and prep-cooks could work together in unison like well-maintained bunchers, delimbers and skidders.

In fact, Anton is currently planning the brunch menu, which The Mill will be serving soon. “The brunch menu will be really exciting. We’re going to make our own Andouille sausage, which is a southern-Louisiana-style sausage, and will be making an Andouille sausage gravy with big handmade biscuits that are fresh every day to serve biscuits and gravy.” Anton said. “We’re going to have shrimp and grits but our shrimp are going to be U.S. cut, nice Gulf shrimp. We’re going to have Anson Mills Grits (organic milled) and we’ll use an heirloom corn, a breed of corn that was almost extinct but was just brought back called Jimmy Red Corn. We’ll also have a crab benedict to die for!”

“If you order a salad don’t expect the iceberg lettuce crunch. You’ll be getting a fresh green salad, harvested not 20 miles away, with an earthy taste full of nutrients. It’s really as farm to table as we can get and the taste is undeniable. Chef Alex has the ability to be a great chef and his food is just absolutely incredible!” Dustin Lowry said.

Because the Lowrys believe in utilizing products that are rooted in this American culture and from the local scene, and source all their food from within a couple hundred miles, The Mill serves beef and Kurobuta pork that come from Snake River Farms and their freshest lettuce is grown from a family owned farm called Lettuce Bee Friends out of Yelm.  “You can taste the difference in the food we serve and that’s where the basis of our inspiration comes from,” said Anton.

Even the booze is influenced by the Lowry’s focus on serving locally sourced healthy food and NW brews. The 20 taps offer local craft beer and there are local wines on the menu. Corey Feldon is the bartender who has been working at The Mill for two months now. He loves selling the sports bar’s top-to-bottom drinks and said the signature cocktails are so well thought out.

“We use all fresh ingredients. Our sparkling strawberry rhubarb (cocktail) has Sparkle Donkey Tequila, fresh muddled lemon and lime. Then it has rhubarb simple syrup that is made here at the back of house and we use fresh strawberry puree. It’s a shaken cocktail and really a refreshing drink and is honestly such an easy sell,” Feldon said. “The wild elderflower Cosmo is another popular signature drink. It has a dash of Giffard Wild Elderflower liqueur in it with local 206 Vodka. Then it’s just a simple drink with a splash of cranberry juice and triple sec, shaken up, and it’s just really refreshing.”

Then Feldon said: “We also carry Nightside Distillery, Half Lion Brewery, Puyallup Brewery, and other great local products that are literally created miles from here. It’s a great feeling to be supporting each other and the community!” According to Feldon, his sports bar customers have been clamoring for this kind of sit down restaurant and bar. “Customers love the atmosphere and many have scheduled birthday parties here,” he said.

As The Mill is new, and many more features, like trivia, are coming very soon, the kitchen is hiring with the goal of being properly being staffed and ready to serve the new brunch. The venue’s website (themillofmilton.com) shows pictures of the restaurant, sports bar and food. There are also tabs for the current menu and for upcoming events. Yet The Mill also has thousands of *likes* and reviews at at Facebook.com/themillofmilton.

 

Check this venue out! You will be really happy you did!

~ The End ~

 

Bartender Corey Feldon
Bartender Corey Feldon loves selling the sports bar’s top-to-bottom drinks and said the signature cocktails are so very well thought out.
Chef Alex Anton
Chef Alex Anton leads the kitchen crew where all food, and even cocktail mixtures, are locally sourced and scratch made.
Ower Dustin Lowry
Dustin Lowry co-owns The Mill, restaurant and sports bar, with his sister Kate Lowry. He brings really great taste to Milton.
The-Mill_entrance
Inside The Mill and behind the front reception desk, there’s a big huge monstrous circular rusty saw-blade called the bolt thrower.

WHAT A STATE REMATCH – Lincoln and O’Dea push each other to the limit

Story by Justin Gimse – Photos by Rocky Ross

There are very few things that can compete with the child-like excitement of an upcoming birthday, or Christmas morning. However, when it comes to sports fans, the opening weekend of football is right up there with the greatest life moments that happen throughout a given year. If one throws in the lack of an NBA team around here, and the “Jeckyl and Hyde” personality of the Seattle Mariners, the time between the Super Bowl and the season kickoff seven months later can often feel like some ridiculous sort of torture.

Well, the pain and suffering has finally ended. Football has returned and it just about feels like the best thing that has ever happened.

The opening weekend of high school football often features some interesting, non-league matchups. After going over the week one list, there was nothing around these parts that could touch the state quarterfinal rematch between the Lincoln Abes and the O’Dea Fighting Irish at Husky Stadium.

When the Associated Press came out with its first top-10 rankings, the voters had O’Dea sitting at second, while the Abes were nestled in at fourth. On paper, it looked like a fair take on a couple of state powerhouse football programs. Both teams would be ushering in new quarterbacks, while still fielding some incredibly talented and dangerous players on both sides of the football.

Before getting into how the game went down, we need to point out something incredible. Between Husky Stadium and Centurylink Field, are there two better stadiums in such close proximity to each other, in the United States? I don’t think there is. Centurylink Field is obviously an awe-inspiring place to take in a football or soccer game, but I think the newly-renovated Husky Stadium has topped it. I know it’s hard to believe, but it’s truly majestic. What a place to kickoff the high school football season.

It’s not often that you get to see a game in week one and wind up feeling like you’ll probably see these two teams go at it again a few months from now in the state tournament. When the dust settled on this game, I think it’s fair to say that all those in attendance wouldn’t mind seeing Lincoln and O’Dea face each other again on the big stage. It was the sort of smash mouth football game that longtime football fans crave. Big hits were followed by big plays, and the game would go down to the final minute, before the Fighting Irish were able to run out the clock for a hard-fought 23-21 victory over Lincoln.

It was a hot day at Husky Stadium, and the sun was shining hot on the Lincoln sidelines. Many folks wondered how it was going to affect them in the second half. While it was very warm up in the stands, the temperature was at least 10 degrees hotter on the turf, if not more.

Lincoln took the opening kickoff and put together an impressive 77-yard drive down the field, mixing together runs by senior running back Tristian Kwon and short passes by sophomore quarterback Caden Filer. Facing second and goal from the three-yard line, Filer took the snap, tucked the ball away and punched the football across the goal-line. Lincoln led 7-0 with 8:38 remaining in the first half.

On the next possession, Lincoln’s defense stiffened at midfield and forced O’Dea to punt the ball away. Lincoln had to start their series from the shadow of their own end-zone, as the drive began on the three-yard line. After passing midfield, the Abes’ offense stalled, and Lincoln turned the ball over on downs. O’Dea would then answer with a drive that resulted in a 37-yard field goal, closing the Lincoln lead to 7-3, with 10:58 remaining in the fourth quarter.

The rest of the second quarter saw both teams give each other their best shots, but the defenses weren’t giving up anything in the way of scoring. By the time the scoreboard clock hit zero, Lincoln still held the 7-3 advantage going into the locker rooms. One of the first-half highlights for the Abes was their discipline. Over recent years, the Abes have often shot themselves in the foot by committing ill-timed penalties. In the first half against O’Dea, the Abes had committed just one infraction, and didn’t turn the ball over a single time.

If one wants to find a solid reason as to why O’Dea came back in the second half to take the victory, an easy finger could be pointed at penalties and turnovers. By the middle of the third quarter, Lincoln had been flagged four times, with the fourth breathing new life into an O’Dea drive that was now on fourth down. The drive began following an interception of Filer at midfield. The possession would lead to a touchdown reception by Cole Daninger and O’Dea would take a 10-7 lead with 2:21 left in the third quarter.

O’Dea would extend their lead to 17-7 on a quarterback scramble by Emonte Scott with 8:46 left in the game. Lincoln would answer immediately. Kwon returned the ensuing kickoff 70 yards to the O’Dea 17-yard line. Four plays later, senior running back Austin Moeung dove across the line for a Lincoln touchdown. O’Dea’s lead was now just 17-14 with 6:39 left in the game.

The Fighting Irish would punch right back, as senior running back Jamyn Patu broke free for a 51-yard run down to the Lincoln 10-yard line. Three plays later, Patu leaped over the right side of the line and into the end-zone. O’Dea now led 23-14 with just 5:32 left in the game.

Lincoln’s next possession would be cut short after just four plays. Filer lofted a ball down the field that came up short and was intercepted. With its running game clicking, it looked as though O’Dea had a good shot at running out much of the remaining clock. However, there was still life in the Abes and footballs have a tendency to bounce funny. After crashing into the right side of the line, Scott coughed up the football and it was immediately scooped up by Lincoln senior Samaad Turner, who rumbled 50 yards into the end-zone. The O’Dea lead was now just 23-21 with 1:54 remaining in the game.

The Abes were just an onside kick away from having a shot at the win, but O’Dea was able to come away with the squib-kick at midfield. For a moment, it looked as though the Abes had recovered the ball, but the officials didn’t agree. After gaining a first down, the Fighting Irish were able to run out the rest of the clock for the win.

Lincoln now heads to Auburn Mountainview on Friday, Sept. 8, for a 7 p.m. kickoff. Like the opener, this will also pit two 2016 state tournament teams against each other in a non-league affair.

No blue ox or snus. The Mill’s chefs serve the best comfort food in Milton

 

By Tami Jackson

Highball it to Milton because there’s a super swank new restaurant and sports bar there where an old favorite once sat. The old bar closed down and the building remained empty for seven years creating a community memory that creates a bit of a log jam for the new happening restaurant and bar that opened at 900 Meridian E. just a few months ago.

“The only negative feedback we’ve received came from people who remembered the old place and expected the same experience; lower quality food, cheaper prices, with pool tables and dart boards,” said Dustin Lowry, co-owner of “The Mill” restaurant and sports bar, which has been completely remodeled to an upscale lumberjack theme. “Fortunately, most people come in here and say ‘wow.’ They absolutely adore us.”

Merely a Paul Bunyan’s bedroll away from his home in Edgewood, Lowry kept his eye on the 6,000 square feet building that was vacant. He knew that long before it had been a bar, the location had supported a historic lumber mill, and since his grandfather had been in the logging industry, perhaps he could capitalize on that logger theme for decorating the establishment that would serve organic foods whenever possible, cooked from scratch to deliver the freshest of local ingredients. So together with his sister Kate Lowry, who has owned Ricky J’s, a bar and grill on 176th St at 68th Ave in the Frederickson neighborhood of Puyallup these past nine years, the two siblings opened their Milton destination together.

Here, folks have already come from far and wide to experience signature drinks, great music, and they can also watch any of a plethora of high definition televisions in the sports bar on any given game night or listen to bands that play on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and other nights on a special occasion. Chris Anderson, who sings crooner songs, such as Mack The Knife, was enjoyed by customers there recently. Yet the music acts at The Mill and the genres of music vary by event.

The ambiance inside the remodeled business is somewhat rustic with smooth finishes and modern lighting. Behind the front reception desk, there’s a big huge monstrous circular rusty saw-blade called the bolt thrower. “At the lumber mill, they’d have stumps that would come through and they didn’t want to ruin their good blades on a big chunky stump but would still need to demolish the stump. So they’d send this blade down from a big pendulum. As the stump would come down the conveyor belt the saw would just swing like this,” Dustin Lowry said, making the swinging arm gesture. Lowry then said he found the saw blade on Craigslist and said he bought it for only a couple hundred bucks. Yet now that it’s all rusted with a backlight against a nicely trimmed wall, it looks like it might have cost more than a few grand.

The Mill’s decor includes lots of roughly hewn wood and many large black and white pictures of logging camps and historical scenes from Milton and Edgewood. They’re photos from the 1910s through 1940s; all restored images that Dustin Lowry acquired from the Washington Historical Society.

“That’s my grandfather, he worked in the logging industry, and that was his hat and his axes,” Dustin Lowry said while pointing to a physical display in the hallway at the back of both the bar and restaurant.

Much of The Mill’s decor is from repurposed accessories like the painted metal lights and tall tables that were cut from the old bar. The overhead spaces feature huge two-man crosscut saws. The lower segment of the exterior walls is made with authentic river rock and the sports bar features a wooden shuffleboard. “The dining room tables were made for us out in Port Orchard and then we had a friend stain them for us to follow that mill-type feel,” Dustin Lowry said then pointed to some rusty metal paneling. “The big old mills had corrugated metal like that which they used as really cheap siding, so we bought a bunch of corrugated metal pieces and our contractor, S&S Renovations, figured out how to rust the inside grooves and then he coated it so our customers would not get tetanus with their dinner.”

The rigging crew who handled all the complicated planning for launching The Mill began with a chef whom the Lowrys recruited from the Pacific Grill. Alex Anton had grown up in the restaurant industry, thanks to his dad who also owned many successful restaurants, and Alex Anton’s first job was to guide the Lowrys on how to make the healthy, scratch made restaurant kitchen that sourced locally to come to fruition, where a full staff of chefs and prep-cooks could work together in unison like well-maintained bunchers, delimbers and skidders.

In fact, Anton is currently planning the brunch menu, which The Mill will be serving soon. “The brunch menu will be really exciting. We’re going to make our own Andouille sausage, which is a southern-Louisiana-style sausage, and will be making an Andouille sausage gravy with big handmade biscuits that are fresh every day to serve biscuits and gravy.” Anton said. “We’re going to have shrimp and grits but our shrimp are going to be U.S. cut, nice Gulf shrimp. We’re going to have Anson Mills Grits (organic milled) and we’ll use an heirloom corn, a breed of corn that was almost extinct but was just brought back called Jimmy Red Corn. We’ll also have a crab benedict to die for!”

“If you order a salad don’t expect the iceberg lettuce crunch. You’ll be getting a fresh green salad, harvested not 20 miles away, with an earthy taste full of nutrients. It’s really as farm to table as we can get and the taste is undeniable. Chef Alex has the ability to be a great chef and his food is just absolutely incredible!” Dustin Lowry said.

Because the Lowrys believe in utilizing products that are rooted in this American culture and from the local scene, and source all their food from within a couple hundred miles, The Mill serves beef and Kurobuta pork that come from Snake River Farms and their freshest lettuce is grown from a family owned farm called Lettuce Bee Friends out of Yelm.  “You can taste the difference in the food we serve and that’s where the basis of our inspiration comes from,” said Anton.

Even the booze is influenced by the Lowry’s focus on serving locally sourced healthy food and NW brews. The 20 taps offer local craft beer and there are local wines on the menu. Corey Feldon is the bartender who has been working at The Mill for two months now. He loves selling the sports bar’s top-to-bottom drinks and said the signature cocktails are so well thought out.

“We use all fresh ingredients. Our sparkling strawberry rhubarb (cocktail) has Sparkle Donkey Tequila, fresh muddled lemon and lime. Then it has rhubarb simple syrup that is made here at the back of house and we use fresh strawberry puree. It’s a shaken cocktail and really a refreshing drink and is honestly such an easy sell,” Feldon said. “The wild elderflower Cosmo is another popular signature drink. It has a dash of Giffard Wild Elderflower liqueur in it with local 206 Vodka. Then it’s just a simple drink with a splash of cranberry juice and triple sec, shaken up, and it’s just really refreshing.”

Then Feldon said: “We also carry Nightside Distillery, Half Lion Brewery, Puyallup Brewery, and other great local products that are literally created miles from here. It’s a great feeling to be supporting each other and the community!” According to Feldon, his sports bar customers have been clamoring for this kind of sit down restaurant and bar. “Customers love the atmosphere and many have scheduled birthday parties here,” he said.

As The Mill is new, and many more features, like trivia, are coming very soon, the kitchen is hiring with the goal of being properly being staffed and ready to serve the new brunch. The venue’s website (themillofmilton.com) shows pictures of the restaurant, sports bar and food. There are also tabs for the current menu and for upcoming events. Yet The Mill also has thousands of *likes* and reviews at at Facebook.com/themillofmilton.

Check this venue out! You will be really happy you did!

 

ANOTHER TITLE FOR PUYALLUP NATION KINGS

Story by Justin Gimse / Photos by Rocky Ross

The world of semi-professional football across the United States is pretty much a mind bender. There are literally hundreds of teams playing at all sorts of levels of competitiveness. It appears that some leagues are taking the forefront and creating a real process toward crowning a national champion. One of those steps toward a national title game went down at Puyallup’s Sparks Stadium on Saturday, Aug. 19.

The champions of the Western Washington Football Alliance were set to face off against the champions of the Pacific Football League. The Puyallup Nation Kings came in riding a 24-game win streak against the visiting Portland Raiders, who brought their own hefty 19-game win streak to the field.

Something was going to have to give, and the end result was going to finally crown a true Pacific Northwest champion.

Throughout the combined 18 games that the championship teams had played thus far, the end result was pretty much a blowout for each and every game. Puyallup rolled up a 10-0 record averaging well over 50 points a game, while giving up just 7 per outing. Portland’s showings were equally impressive, although they played in a PFL league that had dwindled to just four teams by season’s end. Outside of their own league, the Raiders had dispatched several WWFA foes in similar Puyallup manner.

It was nothing but blowouts.

Finally, with all of the chips on the table, the two factions of recent Pacific Northwest domination were going to have at it on the field of battle.

When the final horn sounded, a big breath of relief was let out by the hometown faithful at Sparks Stadium, as the Puyallup Nation Kings dispatched their southern foes by a score of 48-38. For football fans, it was finally a true test for both teams, and the game was still in doubt into the last minutes of the contest.

“The biggest factor of our game was momentum,” said Kings’ co-owner and former defensive lineman Ty Satiacum. “When the momentum was in our favor we capitalized, and creating points off of turnovers which is crucial in big games such as this. Six or seven turnovers created by our defense also helps.”

All the momentum in the stadium was in favor of the Kings in the first quarter. As a matter of fact, the game appeared to be heading toward a massive blowout as Puyallup stifled the Raiders’ offense, causing turnovers, harassing quarterback Russ Schneider and stuffing the line of scrimmage.

After taking the ball on the opening kick-off, Puyallup marched straight down field like a hot knife through a buttery Raiders’ defense. Running back Chris McCutchin punched the ball across the goal-line on first-and-goal to give the Kings a 7-0 advantage with 10:58 left in the first quarter. Following an interception by Puyallup’s Sean Parker, Puyallup drove the ball to the Portland 25-yard line before Portland’s defense stiffened. The King’s had to settle for a big 42-yard field goal off the foot of Paul Dickey. Puyallup now led 10-0 with 8:40 left in the first quarter.

After trading possessions, Puyallup took the ball back following a fumble recovery and short rumble down field by defensive lineman Demetrius Moore. An eight-play, 66-yard drive followed, capped by a 20-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Adam Kruse to a leaping Ktron Barquet in the end-zone. Puyallup now led 16-0 with 1:58 remaining in the first quarter.

The second quarter started much like the first stanza, with Puyallup’s Marcus Reed punching the ball up the middle on a short run for a touchdown. Puyallup’s lead was now 23-0 with 12:27 left in the second quarter and the blowout watch had begun. Portland was able to answer the bell on the next drive, thanks to a couple of big Puyallup penalties that kept them alive twice facing fourth downs. Schneider hit Isaiah Smith on a short slant closing the score to 23-7 with 6:31 left in the first half.

Following a Kings punt, Portland coughed up the football on an interception by Puyallup’s Jerome Williams. Just when it looked as though the Kings were going to hit the gas pedal again, Kruse was intercepted by Jason Pabillano, who returned the ball 46 yards for a touchdown. The Kings would take a 23-13 lead into the locker rooms at halftime.

Puyallup came out swinging in the third quarter, driving 82 yards to the two-yard line, and then the engine stalled. Dickey put a 20-yard field goal through the uprights and Puyallup now led 29-16. After another Raider possession that went nowhere, Puyallup hit pay dirt again when Kruse connected with Barquet for a 31-yard catch and run to push the lead to 36-16 with 6:36 remaining in the third quarter.

The teams traded possessions before Portland took over on their own six-yard line. With their backs against the wall, the Raiders rolled the dice on a big play. Schneider launched a long pass down the sideline that was caught by Andre Dickson, who then outraced the Puyallup defense to the end-zone for a 94-yard touchdown. Puyallup now led 36-23 with 1:56 left in the third quarter.

With Portland nibbling away at the lead, the Kings’ defense stepped up early in the fourth quarter. Schneider sailed a pass too high for his receiver and Puyallup’s Taylor Smith intercepted the ball just an inch from the playing surface. Smith returned the ball inside the 10-yard line, but then fumbled the ball. Luckily, linebacker Vikah Liefau was able to scoop up the ball and take it in for another Puyallup score. The Kings now led 42-23 with 11:52 left in the game. Portland would then put together a 65-yard drive, capped by a short touchdown catch by Nick Bodeman. Puyallup’s lead had now shrunk to 42-30 with 8:45 remaining in regulation.

Puyallup would add another touchdown just over a minute later. Kruse connected with Pierre Culliver on a 64-yard scoring strike that pushed the Kings’ lead to 48-30 with 7:42 left in the game. A late fumble by Kruse would give Portland a short field, but with little time left to do anything. Schneider hit Smith on a 15-yard scoring strike to shrink Puyallup’s lead to 48-38 with 1:36 left to play. An onside kick was on the menu for the Raiders, but kicker Eddie Pazos put too much into it and the ball skipped out of bounds, ending Portland’s chances.

Puyallup will now travel to Sacramento to face the Capital City Fury on Saturday, Sept. 2. Capital City finished the regular season 10-0, winning the Pacific Coast Football League championship. However, the Fury have not played a game since May 13, which could leave them either fresh or rusty. The winner will move on to the semi-pro national championship game in Las Vegas.

“I’ve watched film on our opponent and there’s no question they are the best team in California with an equally impressive 25-0 record,” said Satiacum. “However, they have no out of state play under their belts. We have been battle-tested in multiple states and in dominating fashion.  Anywhere the game goes we have a chance. If it’s an offensive shootout, we have the weapons to go there. If it’s a defensive battle we are ready for that too. We will be ready September 2nd.”