Contemporary artist, Japanese master on display at UPS

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By John Larson – jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

 

Kathy Gore Fuss offers “Above, Below, and Beyond,” a collection of paintings, drawings and photographs contrasting our idealized conceptions of nature with the actual reality. Pictured here is “Through the Canopy,” oil on paper.
Credit: Sy Bean

Work by a contemporary local artist is joined by Japanese prints made in the 1800s at Kittredge Gallery at the University of Puget Sound.

Kathy Gore Fuss offers “Above, Below, and Beyond,” a collection of paintings, drawings and photographs contrasting our idealized conceptions of nature with the actual reality. She earned a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from the University of Washington in 2007.

“Afternoon Walks I, II and III” are forest scenes inspired by the forested areas near the Port of Olympia. “Suspension I” depicts a busy scene of logs being hoisted in the air by a crane. “Loading Day III and IV” show the logs being loaded onto a ship. In her artist’s statement, Gore Fuss examines the importance of forests and conflicts between people and nature. She recently began using a drone with a camera in her photography.

Walnut ink of YUPO is utilized in several works. This method creates a sepia tone. “Nature’s Reward is Big” depicts a jellyfish stuck in a tree.

“A Different Slant” is an oil on canvas painting showing a tree falling. It is suspended in mid-air above a trail. “Through the Canopy” is an oil on paper work. Small panels attached to them create a three-dimensional effect.

“Vantage” is an archival digital print she created with Carl Chew. It depicts a woman standing in a creek, with three ghost images of her in the background. “Island” is an aerial photograph depicting several buildings, which could be land on which the artist lives. Other archival digital prints she did with John Carlton are a series of industrial scenes interposed on decidedly non-industrial sites, such as an oil drilling platform in Capital Lake.

The other exhibit is a rare chance to view a collection of prints made by Japanese artist Utagawa Hiroshige, who lived from 1797 to 1858. “Traversing the Urban Landscape Through the Floating World of Japanese Prints” is 10 prints. This marks the first time they been shown in public since they were donated by Magdalena Maher Shelton in 1999.

A wall panel explains the influence Hiroshige had on artists who came along later, such as Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar Degas and Claude Monet.

“View of Toezian Temple at Ueno” is an aerial view of a Buddhist temple with people walking around it. “Plum Garden at Kameido” offers a closer look at the people, showing details of the clothing being worn.

“View of Mutsuchiyama” shows Mount Fiji in the background. “Inside Zojo-ji Temple” are two very similar prints. A close examination reveals slight variations in colors.

Both exhibits are on display through April 20.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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