Bulletin Board: News from Tacoma and Beyond

0

SOUTH 38TH STREET REOPENS TO ALL TRAFFIC

 

Contractor crews building connecting HOV lanes between State Route 16 and Interstate 5 have re-opened South 38th Street to all traffic in Tacoma. Now at southbound I-5 and eastbound SR 16 drivers exiting to South 38th Street can turn right or left at the top of the ramp. Traffic at the top of the ramp is now controlled by a temporary traffic signal.

The southbound I-5 ramp to westbound South 38th Street is now closed for construction.

Travelers coming from I-705, SR 7 and Pacific Avenue are now shifted onto one lane across the new southbound I-5 bridge. From there, drivers now have the opportunity to exit to South 38th Street or continue to southbound I-5.

WSDOT has posted an image to Flickr that visually describes the temporary changes at the South 38th Street interchange now in place.

This temporary traffic shift will remain in place into June, or until the collector/distributor lanes between eastbound SR 16 and southbound I-5 are rebuilt to meet the new profiles of southbound I-5.

WSDOT would like to thank travelers for their continued patience while crews finish this important work at the I-5 and SR 16 interchange. The I-5 – SR 16 Realignment – HOV Structures and Connections project is expected to be complete this summer.

Updated HOV construction information is available on Tacomatraffic.com. Before heading out the door, travelers can find the latest road conditions on the WSDOT appat www.wsdot.wa.gov/Inform/mobile.htmand by following the WSDOT regional Twitter feed at twitter.com/wsdot_tacoma.

 

TAP INTO TACOMA’S BREWERY DISTRICT

 

Learn about Tacoma’s historic Brewery District, visit one of the local breweries, and find out why Tacoma has been a draw for brewers on Downtown On the Go’s Walk Tacoma Brewery Walk, Wednesday, May 1 from 5:15-6:30 p.m. The event, sponsored by KPG, will start at South 19th and Jefferson at the top of the University of Washington-Tacoma stairs and end with a social at 7 Seas Brewing.

The 1.2-mile walk, led by Andrew Reeves and Jesse Dunagan, will highlight the past, present and future of Tacoma’s breweries and district. Participants will learn about the brewing culture in Tacoma, the brewing process, as well as the history of the Brewery and Warehouse Districts.

Tacoma has a rich brewery history and in recent years has seen a resurgence, with 10 breweries now located in downtown Tacoma. Exciting, new developments are being built in Tacoma’s Brewery District including: Brewery Blocks between C Street and Commerce on South 21st, and Tacoma’s Town Center between South 21st and South 23rd and Jefferson.

Register for the walk online at www.downtownonthego.com/go/walking/walk-2019-pre-registration, or sign-in at the event. The event is free, all ages are welcome, and American Sign Language interpretation will be available.

The Walk Tacoma series, sponsored by the Puyallup Watershed Initiative Active Transportation Community of Interest, is a six-event walking series held on the first Wednesday of the month, from April through August. All walks in the series include activities for children provided by the Children’s Museum of Tacoma.

For more information on the full Walk Tacoma series, visit www.downtownonthego.org or find us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram.

 

COUNTY COUNCIL SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR PERFORMANCE AUDIT COMMITTEE

 

The Pierce County Council seeks applicants to fill one at-large position on the Performance Audit Committee. The Performance Audit Committee studies county programs to improve economy, efficiency and effectiveness.

At-large members serve the public by reviewing audits that assure efficient and effective government through appropriate evidence and auditor independence. The committee meets eight to 10 times a year to decide what should be audited, plan specific audits, acquire audit contractors through a request-for-proposal process, hear audit reports, and make recommendations for action to the County Council and County Executive.

Most meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 10 a.m. in the County Council Chambers at the County-City Building, 930 Tacoma Ave. S. in Tacoma, with occasional special meetings. Audit reports since 2004 are posted at www.piercecountywa.org/performance-audit.

The committee is composed of six members: Councilmembers Jim McCune, Dave Morell and Marty Campbell; Gary Robinson, Finance Department director; and two “at large” members who are appointed by the County Council and represent the public. The committee has one staff member who plans and conducts audits and works with audit contractors.

The position does not include monetary compensation.

Apply by submitting an application including a: brief resume, a letter of interest, and three personal references. Send by email to bill.vetter@piercecountywa.gov or by U.S. mail addressed to: William Vetter, Pierce County Council Office, 930 Tacoma Ave. S., Room 1046, Tacoma, WA 98402.

 

TACOMA’S FIRST-EVER SCHOOL BASED CLINIC CELEBRATES OPENING

 

At Tacoma’s Oakland High School, MultiCare Health System is improving access to health care for youth in our community through a new in-school clinic. At the beginning of April, doors opened at the MultiCare Health Clinic at Oakland, the first school-based clinic in Tacoma. The clinic exclusively serves the students of Tacoma Public Schools’ Oakland High School and students’ children who attend the onsite daycare.

The clinic was developed in partnership between Tacoma Public Schools, MultiCare and Communities in Schools. MultiCare physicians and nurse practitioners staff the clinic. The clinic provides preventive care, behavioral health care and treatment for illness and injury.

A grand opening celebration for the clinic was hosted in Tuesday, April 23. The focus of the celebration is Oakland students and their families, “This clinic is for our students. We hope by having a celebration event that students who haven’t yet taken advantage of the clinic will come and see what is available to them,” said Tacoma Public Schools Superintendent, Carla Santorno.

Communities in Schools plays a critical role of helping students and families under their insurance options. Oakland Communities in Schools’ coordinator, Passia Abraham said, “I am here to work with students one-on-one, and that individual help really makes a difference.”

“Our mission is partnering for healing and a healthy future and this new clinic is a shining example of how we can work with other organizations to meet the health care needs of the people in our communities,” said Bill Robertson, President and CEO of MultiCare. “Putting our health care providers into the school means these students and their children will have easier access to vital health services.”

 

HOW CLOSE IS TOO CLOSE DURING FLU SEASON?

 

Want to beat the odds of getting tagged with the flu? Given the severity of the 2017-18 season, it may be a good idea to put some distance between you and the contagious culprit that peaks annual from December through May.

Where’s the safety zone? The virus is primarily transmitted from one person to the next through droplets emitted when we cough, sneeze or talk. These tiny particles can travel up to six feetafter a cough, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Sneeze particles can be propelled 200 feet.

When am I most at risk? People are most contagious during the first three to four days of the flu. What makes things more complicated, however, is that even seemingly healthy adults who have been infected by the flu can be infectious one day prior to experiencing symptoms, and up to seven days after becoming sick, the CDC estimates. Individuals with weakened immune systems or children may remain contagious for longer periods. If you suspect you or a family member may have the flu, it may be best to consider staying home from work or school.

Does the flu shot really work? The flu vaccine ups your game by reducing the risk from being exposed to the virus by up to 40 to 60 percent, depending on the seasonal flu illness that is in the community. While many misconceptions exist, immunization is the key strategy to protect yourself and others, particularly vulnerable infants, young children and other adults.

Take proactive steps to help avoid influenza:

  • Take care.Help your body stay healthy by getting plenty of rest, eating right and drinking fluids.
  • Wash your hands.Most people don’t do it well enough. Here’s how: cdc.gov/handwashing
  • Minimize germs.Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are particularly helpful ingroup settings. Choose products that contain at least 60 percent alcohol.
  • Clean sweep.Use disinfecting wipes to sanitize high-use areas around your home, work and school. A few hot spots where germs spread, including keyboards, doorknobs, faucet handles and countertops.
  • Schedule checkups with caution.Clinic visits may expose you and your family members to more germs. The American Academy of Pediatricians issues guidelines for bringing children to the doctor’s office. Consider a germ-free virtual visit to connect with your doctor via computer or phone.

Wondering whether you have the flu or just a pesky cold? Review common symptoms at https://newsroom.uhc.com/health/coldvsflu.html and find more preventative tips at www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/prevention.htm. If you suspect you have influenza, contact your care provider.

UnitedHealthcare of Washington

 

CITY OF PUYALLUP HONORS MEMORIAL DAY

 

Puyallup’s official city observance of Memorial Day will be in the Pioneer Park Pavilion on Sunday, May 26 at 1 p.m. The ceremonies honor our nation’s fallen and the 137 Puyallup citizens who have died in conflicts from World War I to today.

State Senator Hans Zeiger (25th legislative district) and an Air Force Reserve officer, is the guest speaker. Zeiger is also an historian and recently published his book, “Puyallup in World War II, about the community’s military members and civilian contributions during the war.

The Clan Gordon Pipe Band and Puyallup High School Wind Ensemble will play. The program includes reading the names of the fallen and placing wreaths, donated by local organizations, at the park’s military memorial statue next to the pavilion.

The program concludes with the stirring “Amazing Grace”played by the Clan Gordon Pipe Band followed by the rifle salute and “Taps.”

The event is free, with indoor seating and is suitable for all ages.

 

Subscribe to our newsletter

To stay updated with all the latest news, and offers.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.