TCC’s Diversity Film Series begins April 15

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Tacoma Community College’s eighth annual Diversity Film Festival runs April 15 through May 2. All films are shown at the Grand Cinema (606 S. Fawcett Ave., Tacoma). Tickets are $2 with TCC student I.D.; all others are $8 matinee, $10.50 general admission with discounts for students, seniors and military.

‘Gook’
Sunday, April 15, 2 p.m.
Opening Day Gala with food and fun after the film 
Eli and Daniel, two Korean American brothers, own a struggling shoe store and have an unlikely friendship with Kamilla, a streetwise 11-year-old African American girl. Kamilla ditches school, Eli stresses about the store, and Daniel tries to have a good time. It’s just another typical day at the store until the Rodney King verdict is read and riots break out. With the chaos moving toward them, the trio is forced to defend the store while contemplating the future of their own personal dreams and the true meaning of family.

‘Out of State’ (Documentary)
Tuesday, April 17, 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
“Out of State” is the story of outcasts, of native Hawaiian prisoners shipped 3,000 miles across the ocean to a for-profit prison in the desert of Arizona. In this unlikely setting, these men discover their fierce indigenous dances, inspiring two students to fight to turn their lives around upon release.

Radio Dreams
Tuesday, April 24, 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Hamid (actor/musician Mohsen Namjoo) immigrates to the U.S. to pursue his writing career and the American dream. Instead, he winds up working at a small Iranian radio station, seeking artistic satisfaction through the esoteric programming he puts together for his radio audience. Meanwhile, the owners of the station try to cash in on Hamid’s only program that they see fit for commercial success — the bringing together of an on-air jam session with Kabul Dreams and their long-time idols, Metallica. The ensuing collision between artistic integrity and crass commercialism resonates with hilarity and a poignant message, as Hamid fights to maintain a balance between his ambitions and his moral compass. 

‘Whose Streets?’ (Documentary)
Wednesday, April 25, 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Told by the activists and leaders who live and breathe this movement for justice, “Whose Streets?” is an unflinching look at the Ferguson uprising. When unarmed teenager Michael Brown is killed by police and left lying in the street for hours, it marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis. Grief, long-standing racial tensions and renewed anger bring residents together to hold vigils and protest this latest tragedy. Empowered parents, artists, and teachers from around the country come together as freedom fighters. As the National Guard descends on Ferguson with military grade weaponry, these young community members become the torchbearers of a new resistance. Filmmakers Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis know this story because they are the story. “Whose Streets?” is a powerful battle cry from a generation fighting, not for their civil rights, but for the right to live.

‘Winter’s Bone’
Sunday, April 29, 2 p.m.
Her family home in danger of being repossessed after her meth-cooking dad skips bail and disappears, Ozark teen Ree Dolly (Jennifer Lawrence) breaks the local code of conduct by confronting her kin about their conspiracy of silence. Should she fail to track her father down, Ree Dolly, her younger siblings, and their disabled mother will soon be rendered homeless.

‘East Side Sushi’
Wednesday, May 2, 2 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
“East Side Sushi” introduces us to Juana, a working-class Latina single mother. Forced to give up her fruit-vending cart in order to find a more secure job, Juana lands a position as a kitchen assistant at a local Japanese restaurant and discovers a whole new world of cuisine and culture, as well as a new friend. While working in the restaurant’s kitchen, Juana secretly observes the sushi chefs and eventually teaches herself to make a multitude of sushi. Her creativity sparked, Juana’s re-ignited passion for food drives her to want more from her job and her life. Eventually, she attempts to become a sushi chef, but is unable to because she is the “wrong” race and gender. Against all odds, she embarks on a journey of self-discovery, determined to not let anyone stop her from achieving her dream.

For more information on TCC Diversity Film Fest visit www.tacomacc.edu/abouttcc/newsandevents/filmfestival.

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